Saturday, November 12, 2016

The Good Old Gospel Ship: Where is it in the Bible?


John 6:16: And when evening was now come his disciples went down to the sea 17: And entered into a ship and went over the sea toward Capernaum And it was now dark and Iesous had not come to them 18: And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew 19: So when they had rowed about five and twenty or thirty furlongs they saw Iesous walking on the sea and drawing near to the ship and they were afraid 20: But he said to them It is I be not afraid 21: Then they willingly received him into the ship and immediately the ship was at the land where they were going[1]




[1] The entire ship, along with its inhabitants, was translated immediately from one physical location to another. The scriptures give more than one example (or "Type") of this. Enoch was translated directly into heaven from earth Genesis 5:24. Phillip was translated from one physical location on earth to another physical location on earth Acts 8:39-40. One day the entire Body of Christ will be translated from this earth to meet the Lord in the air 1 Corinthians 15:51-52, 1 Thessalonians 4:15-17.

Untranslated Words in this Chapter or passage of the HHBC 
Iesous Pronounced Ee-A-Soos G2424 translated Jesus: Yeshua is the Hebrew name, and its English spelling is “Joshua.” Iesous is the Greek transliteration of the Hebrew name, and its English spelling is “Jesus.” Thus, the names “Joshua” and “Jesus” are essentially the same; both are English pronunciations of the Hebrew and Greek names for our Lord. For examples of how the two names are interchangeable, see Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8 in the KJV. In both cases, the word Iesous refers to the Old Testament character Joshua. Because of disparities in English translation of the word, Iesous will remain untranslated throughout the main body of scripture this commentary.
Amen G281 When used at the beginning of a discourse, it means truly or assuredly; When used at the end of a discourse or prayer, it means so be it, let it be so: The word "amen" is a most remarkable word. It was transliterated directly from the Hebrew into the Greek of the New Testament, then into Latin and into English and many other languages, so that it is practically a universal word. It has been called the best known word in human speech. The word is directly related — in fact, almost identical — to the Hebrew word for "believe" (amam), or faithful. Thus, it came to mean "sure" or "truly", an expression of absolute trust and confidence. — HMM
Iesous Pronounced Ee-A-Soos G2424 translated Jesus: Yeshua is the Hebrew name, and its English spelling is “Joshua.” Iesous is the Greek transliteration of the Hebrew name, and its English spelling is “Jesus.” Thus, the names “Joshua” and “Jesus” are essentially the same; both are English pronunciations of the Hebrew and Greek names for our Lord. For examples of how the two names are interchangeable, see Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8 in the KJV. In both cases, the word Iesous refers to the Old Testament character Joshua. Because of disparities in English translation of the word, Iesous will remain untranslated throughout the main body of scripture this commentary.
Ho G3588 definite article corresponding to: the; this; that. Other usages include: of; etc.; who; which
Theos G2316 Deity; god; The reason the word, Theos, is largely left untranslated in this commentary, is to put to rest erroneous teaching that the word must be prefaced by the definite article, “ho,” in order to be referring to Yahweh. In fact, most New Testament scripture references to Theos are not introduced using the definite article, “ho,” but even so, it cannot be argued when the Almighty is being referenced—especially in the case of John 1:1, where John, a Jew who would never commit blasphemy by following anyone who was called “A” god, calls Jesus God. John was specifically stating that Jesus is YHWH [Yahweh].



When we understand God's great Redemption, Bible prophecy is neither complicated nor mysterious